Teaching Philosophy

There are many approaches to teaching an instrument, just as there are many kinds of student. Over the years I have refined my teaching style to focus on what I like to call "The Four T's" of musicianship. These four criteria (explained in detail below) are true for all musicians who strive to be masters of their craft.

 

I also believe in giving my students the tools they need to be successful, whatever that may mean to them.

So whether you want to:

  • Learn how to play jazz, rock, pop or funk.

  • Improve your technique, feel and groove.

  • Take your first steps towards improvising on the bass guitar.

I can help you get closer to your goal of being a better bass player.

 

Bass Lessons Melbourne
The Four "T's" Of Musicianship
TIME
"The wrong note at the right time is better than the right note at the wrong time..."

The one thing that connects all great bass players is their ability to play with good time. If you wonder why some guys are getting all the work and your inbox is empty, it's probably not because they know more scales than you, it's beacuse they have great feel. Working with drum loops, metronomes and you own inner clock are key to developing good time on the bass.

TONE
"Tone is in the ear of the beholder...."

While it may be true that 'good tone' is subjective, developing your own voice on the instrument is an important element of becoming a better musician. There are many factors that make up your sonic fingerprint: the type of bass you have, what strings you use, even the shape of your fingers, and by helping you understanding what kind of control you have over each of these elements, we can work towards creating a sound that is uniquely you.

TECHNIQUE
"What's the point in owning a Ferrari if you don't know how to drive....?"

I believe technique is the key to being able to transfer what you hear in your head, to your instrument in a clear and efficient way. Fingerstyle, pickstyle, slapping, tapping, palm muting, strumming.... they are all valid ways of playing the bass. However, just like driving a car, knowing how to change gear and turn the steering wheel does not make you a good driver, which leads us to the fourth and final "T"....

TASTE
"Sometimes it's the notes you don't play that sound the loudest..."

Perhaps the most difficult element to teach, taste, is ultimately what will make people connect with your playing more than anything else. What notes you choose to play, how you play them, and where you place them, have a huge impact on the musical setting. I aim to help you make the best choices you can by giving you a strong foundation and understanding of both your role as a bass player, and the possibilities of the instrument.